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Many people immigrating to the United States often have questions about the process. Here are some of the most common questions people ask. We hope you find these answers helpful, but remember this is not legal advice and it is always best to consult an Immigration Attorney before beginning with the immigration process. “How Do I Get a Green Card?” There are many ways to get a Lawful Permanent Residence card, otherwise known as a “Green Card” in the United States.  These include, but are not limited to: 1. Through a family member 2. Through an employer 3. Through the diversity visa lottery; 4. By being granted asylum 5. By entering the US as a refugee. If successful, those who are granted Lawful Permanent Residence status can apply to obtain a work permit, and even apply to become US Citizens a few years later.   “I am the victim of a crime that happened in the United States.  Is there any immigration protection for me?” There are immigration benefits available to those who have been the victim of a crime which took place in the United States.  These may include T-visas for people who have been trafficked into the country and U-visas for victims of other crimes.  Women and their children may also qualify for VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) protection in certain circumstances.  If you think you may qualify for these benefits, you should schedule a consultation to learn about your options.   “I Have No Immigration Papers. If ICE Finds Me, Can They Deport Me Right Away?” If this is the first time you have been apprehended by ICE officials, they cannot deport you right away.  ICE cannot just put an undocumented person on a plane to his or her home country without proper notice, and without the person having a hearing in front of an Immigration Judge to try to prove the he or she should not be deported.  If you or someone you know has been apprehended by ICE officials, it is important you contact an Immigration Attorney immediately to represent you in court.   “My Relative Was Taken Into Immigration Custody. What Can I Do?” First and foremost, your relative should not be afraid of being in custody.  It may be alarming, but no harm should come to your relative.  It is also very important that your relative not sign any documents, and that they politely ask to speak with an Immigration Attorney. An attorney will be able to advise your relative of their rights, and what steps they take to try and get out of Immigration custody.  Each case is different, and so the circumstances of each person will determine if and how they can get out of custody, and what their options will be for remaining in the United States.   “How Can I Extend My Stay in the US?” In order for a foreign national to stay in the US past their nonimmigrant visa expiration date, they must file for an extension with the US Citizenship and Immigration Services.   “What Are Deportable Offenses?” Some crimes or instances of fraud can result in a foreign national having to leave the US.  These offenses include using false documents to enter the US, making false statements to US officials in order to receive a visa, committing certain drug crimes, violent crimes and other felonies, posing a threat to national security, helping others enter the US illegally, overstaying a visa, and voting without being a citizen.   “I am a Naturalized Citizen of the US. Are My Children Citizens as Well?” Usually if children are Permanent Residents, they can derive citizenship from their naturalized parents. In most cases, your child is a citizen if all the following are true: 1. The other parent is also naturalized, or 2. You are the only surviving parent, or 3. You have legal custody and, 4. The child was under 18 years of age when the parent(s) naturalized   “Is It Possible to be a Citizen of the US and Another Country?” Yes. If you had dual citizenship at birth or from childhood, or you became a citizen of another country after already having US citizenship, you may qualify for dual citizenship.   “What Is The Difference Between an Immigrant and a Non Immigrant Visa? An immigrant visa allows the holder to work and live permanently in the US as a lawful permanent resident (also known as a “green card holder”). A non immigrant visa allows the holder to stay in the US for a limited amount of time and for a limited purpose (such as tourism, academic studies or medical treatment).   Don’t see the answer to your question?  Click here to email us your question and we will respond back shortly, or call our office at 951-808-3630 to set up an appointment to come in and tell us about your situation.

Many people immigrating to the United States often have questions about the process. Here are some of the most common questions people ask. We hope you find these answers helpful, but remember this is not legal advice and it is always best to consult an Immigration Attorney before beginning with the immigration process.

1. “How Do I Get a Green Card?”

There are many ways to get a Lawful Permanent Residence card, otherwise known as a “Green Card” in the United States.  These include, but are not limited to:

1. Through a family member;
2. Through an employer;
3. Through the diversity visa lottery;
4. By being granted asylum;
5. By entering the US as a refugee.

If successful, those who are granted Lawful Permanent Residence status can apply to obtain a work permit, and even apply to become US Citizens a few years later.

2. “I am the victim of a crime that happened in the United States.  Is there any immigration protection for me?”

There are immigration benefits available to those who have been the victim of a crime which took place in the United States.  These may include T-visas for people who have been trafficked into the country and U-visas for victims of other crimes.  Women and their children may also qualify for VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) protection in certain circumstances.  If you think you may qualify for these benefits, you should schedule a consultation to learn about your options.

3. “I Have No Immigration Papers. If ICE Finds Me, Can They Deport Me Right Away?”

If this is the first time you have been apprehended by ICE officials, they cannot deport you right away.  ICE cannot just put an undocumented person on a plane to his or her home country without proper notice, and without the person having a hearing in front of an Immigration Judge to try to prove the he or she should not be deported.  If you or someone you know has been apprehended by ICE officials, it is important you contact an Immigration Attorney immediately to represent you in court.

4. “My Relative Was Taken Into Immigration Custody. What Can I Do?”

First and foremost, your relative should not be afraid of being in custody.  It may be alarming, but no harm should come to your relative.  It is also very important that your relative not sign any documents, and that they politely ask to speak with an Immigration Attorney. An attorney will be able to advise your relative of their rights, and what steps they take to try and get out of immigration custody.  Each case is different, and so the circumstances of each person will determine if and how they can get out of custody, and what their options will be for remaining in the United States.

5. “How Can I Extend My Stay in the US?”

In order for a foreign national to stay in the US past their non-immigrant visa expiration date, they must file for an extension with the US Citizenship and Immigration Services.

6. “What Are Deportable Offenses?”

Some crimes or instances of fraud can result in a foreign national having to leave the US.  These offenses include using false documents to enter the US, making false statements to US officials in order to receive a visa, committing certain drug crimes, violent crimes and other felonies, posing a threat to national security, helping others enter the US illegally, overstaying a visa, and voting without being a citizen.

7. “I am a Naturalized Citizen of the US. Are My Children Citizens as Well?”

Usually if children are Permanent Residents, they can derive citizenship from their naturalized parents. In most cases, your child is a citizen if all the following are true:

1. The other parent is also naturalized;
2. You are the only surviving parent;
3. You have legal custody;
4. The child was under 18 years of age when the parent(s) naturalized.

8. “Is It Possible to be a Citizen of the US and Another Country?”

Yes. If you had dual citizenship at birth or from childhood, or you became a citizen of another country after already having US citizenship, you may qualify for dual citizenship.

9. “What Is The Difference Between an Immigrant and a Non Immigrant Visa?”

An immigrant visa allows the holder to work and live permanently in the US as a lawful permanent resident (also known as a “green card holder”). A non immigrant visa allows the holder to stay in the US for a limited amount of time and for a limited purpose (such as tourism, academic studies or medical treatment).

 

Don’t see the answer to your question?  Email us your question at Mansfieldlawgroup@gmail.com and we will respond back shortly, or call our office at 951-808-3630 to set up an appointment to come in and tell us about your situation.Many people immigrating to the United States often have questions about the process. Here are some of the most common questions people ask. We hope you find these answers helpful, but remember this is not legal advice and it is always best to consult an Immigration Attorney before beginning with the immigration process. “How Do I Get a Green Card?” There are many ways to get a Lawful Permanent Residence card, otherwise known as a “Green Card” in the United States.  These include, but are not limited to: 1. Through a family member 2. Through an employer 3. Through the diversity visa lottery; 4. By being granted asylum 5. By entering the US as a refugee. If successful, those who are granted Lawful Permanent Residence status can apply to obtain a work permit, and even apply to become US Citizens a few years later.   “I am the victim of a crime that happened in the United States.  Is there any immigration protection for me?” There are immigration benefits available to those who have been the victim of a crime which took place in the United States.  These may include T-visas for people who have been trafficked into the country and U-visas for victims of other crimes.  Women and their children may also qualify for VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) protection in certain circumstances.  If you think you may qualify for these benefits, you should schedule a consultation to learn about your options.   “I Have No Immigration Papers. If ICE Finds Me, Can They Deport Me Right Away?” If this is the first time you have been apprehended by ICE officials, they cannot deport you right away.  ICE cannot just put an undocumented person on a plane to his or her home country without proper notice, and without the person having a hearing in front of an Immigration Judge to try to prove the he or she should not be deported.  If you or someone you know has been apprehended by ICE officials, it is important you contact an Immigration Attorney immediately to represent you in court.   “My Relative Was Taken Into Immigration Custody. What Can I Do?” First and foremost, your relative should not be afraid of being in custody.  It may be alarming, but no harm should come to your relative.  It is also very important that your relative not sign any documents, and that they politely ask to speak with an Immigration Attorney. An attorney will be able to advise your relative of their rights, and what steps they take to try and get out of Immigration custody.  Each case is different, and so the circumstances of each person will determine if and how they can get out of custody, and what their options will be for remaining in the United States.   “How Can I Extend My Stay in the US?” In order for a foreign national to stay in the US past their nonimmigrant visa expiration date, they must file for an extension with the US Citizenship and Immigration Services.   “What Are Deportable Offenses?” Some crimes or instances of fraud can result in a foreign national having to leave the US.  These offenses include using false documents to enter the US, making false statements to US officials in order to receive a visa, committing certain drug crimes, violent crimes and other felonies, posing a threat to national security, helping others enter the US illegally, overstaying a visa, and voting without being a citizen.   “I am a Naturalized Citizen of the US. Are My Children Citizens as Well?” Usually if children are Permanent Residents, they can derive citizenship from their naturalized parents. In most cases, your child is a citizen if all the following are true: 1. The other parent is also naturalized, or 2. You are the only surviving parent, or 3. You have legal custody and, 4. The child was under 18 years of age when the parent(s) naturalized   “Is It Possible to be a Citizen of the US and Another Country?” Yes. If you had dual citizenship at birth or from childhood, or you became a citizen of another country after already having US citizenship, you may qualify for dual citizenship.   “What Is The Difference Between an Immigrant and a Non Immigrant Visa? An immigrant visa allows the holder to work and live permanently in the US as a lawful permanent resident (also known as a “green card holder”). A non immigrant visa allows the holder to stay in the US for a limited amount of time and for a limited purpose (such as tourism, academic studies or medical treatment).   Don’t see the answer to your question?  Click here to email us your question and we will respond back shortly, or call our office at 951-808-3630 to set up an appointment to come in and tell us about your situation.

Muchas personas que emigran a los Estados Unidos a menudo tienen preguntas sobre el proceso. Estas son algunas de las preguntas más comunes que tienes los inmigrantes. Esperamos que estas respuestas sean útiles, pero recuerde, esto no es asesoría legal y siempre es indispensable consultar a un abogado de inmigración antes de comenzar con el proceso de inmigración.

1. “¿Cómo puedo obtener una tarjeta verde?”

Hay muchas maneras de obtener una tarjeta de Residencia Permanente Legal, también conocida como “Green Card” en los Estados Unidos. Estos incluyen, pero no están limitados a:

1) A través de un miembro de la familia;
2) A través de un empleador;
3) A través de la lotería de visas de diversidad;
4) Mediante la concesión de asilo;
5) Al entrar a los EE.UU. como refugiado. Si tiene éxito, los que son concedidos la condición legal de residente permanente puede aplicar para obtener un permiso de trabajo, e incluso aplicar para convertirse en ciudadanos de Estados Unidos unos años más tarde.  

2. “¿Yo soy la víctima de un crimen que ocurrió en los Estados Unidos. ¿Hay alguna protección de la inmigración para mí?”

Hay beneficios de inmigración disponibles para aquellos que han sido víctima de un crimen que tuvo lugar en los Estados Unidos. Estos pueden incluir T-visas para personas que han sido traficados en el país y U-visas para las víctimas de otros delitos. Las mujeres y sus hijos también pueden calificar para VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) de protección en determinadas circunstancias. Si usted piensa que usted puede calificar para estos beneficios, usted debe programar una consulta para conocer sus opciones.

3. “No tengo papeles de inmigración. Si el ICE me encuentra, me pueden deportar en seguida?”

Si esta es la primera vez que ha sido detenido por funcionarios del ICE, no te pueden deportar inmediatamente. ICE no puede poner a una persona indocumentada en un avión al país a su patria y sin previo aviso, y sin que la persona tenga una audiencia frente un Juez de Inmigración para tratar de probar que él o ella no debe ser deportado. Si usted o alguien que usted conoce ha sido detenido por funcionarios del ICE, es importante que se comunique con un abogado de inmigración inmediatamente para que lo represente en la corte.

4. “Mi pariente fue puesto en custodia de Inmigración. ¿Qué puedo hacer?”

En primer lugar, su pariente no debe tener miedo de ser detenido. Puede ser alarmante, pero ningún daño debe venir a su familiar. También es muy importante que su relación no firme cualquier documento, y que cortésmente pida hablar con un abogado de inmigración. Un abogado será capaz de aconsejar a su familiar de sus derechos, y qué pasos puede tomar para tratar de salir de la custodia de Inmigración. Cada caso es diferente, por lo que las circunstancias de cada persona determinaran si y cómo pueden salir en libertad, y cuáles son sus opciones serán para que permanezca en los Estados Unidos.

5. “¿Cómo puedo prolongar mi estancia en los EE.UU.?”

Para que un ciudadano extranjero a permanecer en los EE.UU. después de la fecha de caducidad de no-inmigrante de visado, deberán solicitar una extensión con la Ciudadanía de los EE.UU. y Servicios de Inmigración.

6. “¿Cuáles son ofensas de deportación?”

Algunos delitos o casos de fraude puede dar lugar a un extranjero tener que salir de los EE.UU. Estos delitos incluyen el uso de documentos falsos para ingresar a los EE.UU., hacer declaraciones falsas a funcionarios de Estados Unidos para recibir una visa, cometer ciertos delitos de drogas, crímenes violentos y otros delitos graves, lo que representa una amenaza para la seguridad nacional, ayudar a otros a entrar a los EE.UU. ilegalmente, quedarse más una visa, y votar sin ser ciudadano.

7. “Yo soy un ciudadano naturalizado de los EE.UU. Son ciudadanos mis hijos también?”

Por lo general, si los niños son residentes permanentes, pueden obtener la ciudadanía de sus padres naturalizados. En la mayoría de los casos, su hijo es un ciudadano, si todo se cumple lo siguiente:

1) El otro padre también es naturalizado;
2) Usted es el único padre sobreviviente;
3) Usted tiene la custodia legal;
4) El niño tenía menos de 18 años de edad cuando el padre (s) de naturalizados

8. “¿Es posible ser ciudadano de los EE.UU. y otro país?”

Sí. Si usted tuviera la doble nacionalidad al nacer o desde la infancia, o que se convirtió en un ciudadano de otro país después de que ya tiene ciudadanía de EE.UU., usted puede calificar para la doble nacionalidad.

9. “¿Cuál es la diferencia entre un inmigrante y una visa de no-inmigrante?”

Una visa de inmigrante permite a su titular para trabajar y vivir permanentemente en los EE.UU. como residente legal permanente (también conocida como “green card”). Una visa de no inmigrante le permite a su titular a permanecer en los EE.UU. durante un período de tiempo limitado y para un propósito limitado (como el turismo, los estudios académicos o tratamiento médico).

 

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